How to Stop Creativity

Anyone can stop creativity with a little intentionality.  If you are searching for ways to turn off the creative juices that keep you up at night and that interrupt your carefully planned meetings, these ten steps should be very helpful.

  1. Be Practical.  The creative process often involves exploring impractical ideas.  Nip that tendency in the bud; insist on only entertaining ideas that make financial and logistical sense.
  2. Be Correct.  Make certain to correct creatives often.  Their statements are often off the wall and completely devoid of scientific reasoning.
  3. Be Realistic.  Never suspend reality.  Keep imagination within the bounds of the five senses.
  4. Be Cautious.  Creatives like to break the rules and kill sacred cows; ban all ideas that might offend someone somewhere sometime.
  5. Be Structured.  Make certain all meetings strictly adhere to a set agenda and never wander.  Rabbit holes are the devil.
  6. Be Respectful.  Only one person make speak at any one time.  Period.
  7. Be Present.   Absolutely positively do not allow technology into your meetings.  No one should be surfing the net and crowdsourcing your ideas.
  8. Be Reverent.  Irreverence is a sign of immaturity and has no place in adult discussions.
  9. Be Quiet.  Insist on silence or quiet conversation only.  Raucous laughter should be kept out of the work environment.
  10. Be Still.  Hand motions should be reserved for indicating information on charts, writing, and drinking coffee.  All other hand motions are distracting and should be avoided at all costs.

If after implementing these ten steps you still are encountering large amounts of creativity, quit your job and find a more reasonable place to work.

Of course, if you wish to encourage creativity for some reason, you could simply do the opposite of everything I mentioned above.

How do you stifle or encourage creativity at work or at home?

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “How to Stop Creativity

  1. Really enjoyed this, thanks! Am having a meeting soon about the “ludicrous” idea of starting a theatre company, and your blog came up when I was researching how to avoid those “stopping” statements that people use to censor and end a discussion. I’m going to print out your rules!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s